Slowly watching every movie on the "They Shoot Pictures Don't They?" List of the 1000 Greatest Movies of All Time.

THE LIST

Current Completion: 40%

 

Anonymous asked
how old are you?

savethetumors asked
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Hey. You are cute.

moviesin100wordsorless asked
Keep up the good work. I'm a big fan. Your blog pretty much inspired me to make my own blog.

I do not know how to respond to a compliment of this magnitude other than through the art of mating dance.

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THE BEST TUMBLR JE ADORE.

shucks :)

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Apologies for my Absence.

It’s that time of year again, when TSPDT throws a big giant kink in my project by shaking everything up on me. Time to get it sorted out again!

With the February 2014 update, we

LOST:

  1. Beyond the Valley of the Dolls 
  2. Broadway Danny Rose 
  3. The Childhood of Maxim Gorky 
  4. Forbidden Planet 
  5. The 47 Ronin 
  6. Gandhi 
  7. The Intruder 
  8. Les Maitres Fous 
  9. One, Two, Three 
  10. Plein Soleil  
  11. The Red and The White 
  12. The Shanghai Gesture 
  13. 3 Women
  14. Variety 

GAINED:

  1. Titanic
  2. Arrivee d’un Train a L’ Ciotat
  3. Alice
  4. Crash *(returning to list, previously blogged)
  5. The Last of the Mohicans
  6. Gregory’s Girl *(returning to list, previously blogged)
  7. The Verdict *(returning to list, previously blogged)
  8. Haxan
  9. The Man in the White Suit *(returning to list, previously blogged)
  10. Female Trouble *(returning to list, previously blogged)
  11. Winchester ‘73 *(returning to list, previously blogged)

So there we have it.  If I am not mistaken, (and I very likely am), this puts us to push through 2014 from #401. Still 40% completion. Nice and tidy. We will get started again very soon - It’s spring break and I am screening like crazy!

409. The Shop Around the Corner, 1940. USA. 
D. Ernst Lubitsch
They’ve never met in person, they’ve never seen each other’s face, they have never even exchanged names. But she’s pretty sure they are engaged….
God bless early 1940’s sensibilities. This film is so old-fashioned and adorable. The leads are incredibly charming.
But for me, this movie sings mostly because of the supporting cast. Frank Morgan as the distraught Hugo Matuscheck. Sara Haden’s giddy Flora. And above all, William Tracy as the precocious Pepi Katona, a character so tiny and yet so perfect that, for maybe the only time in my life, I found myself wishing he could have his own spin-off 70 years later.
Like The Philadelphia Story, I see many many rewatches of this in the future for me.

409. The Shop Around the Corner, 1940. USA. 

D. Ernst Lubitsch

They’ve never met in person, they’ve never seen each other’s face, they have never even exchanged names. But she’s pretty sure they are engaged….

God bless early 1940’s sensibilities. This film is so old-fashioned and adorable. The leads are incredibly charming.

But for me, this movie sings mostly because of the supporting cast. Frank Morgan as the distraught Hugo Matuscheck. Sara Haden’s giddy Flora. And above all, William Tracy as the precocious Pepi Katona, a character so tiny and yet so perfect that, for maybe the only time in my life, I found myself wishing he could have his own spin-off 70 years later.

Like The Philadelphia Story, I see many many rewatches of this in the future for me.

408. Floating Weeds, 1959. Japan.
D. Yasujirō Ozu
I have never seen such astonishing mise en scene. It is an ode to geometry. It is an ode to the color red. 
A tremendously beautiful film, exuding grace and harmony and balance in that way that only Ozu can seem to do. The composition is stunning, the performances are powerful, the story simple but moving.
It’s Ozu. So naturally, it’s lovely all over.

408. Floating Weeds, 1959. Japan.

D. Yasujirō Ozu

I have never seen such astonishing mise en scene. It is an ode to geometry. It is an ode to the color red. 

A tremendously beautiful film, exuding grace and harmony and balance in that way that only Ozu can seem to do. The composition is stunning, the performances are powerful, the story simple but moving.

It’s Ozu. So naturally, it’s lovely all over.

407. Tristana, 1970. France.
D. Luis Buñuel
It feels much more… sober than any other Buñuel I’ve seen. Much more clear. I felt it was a very thoughtful exploration of the choices this woman makes when she holds very little personal autonomy. Catherine Deneuve is perfect, as usual.

407. Tristana, 1970. France.

D. Luis Buñuel

It feels much more… sober than any other Buñuel I’ve seen. Much more clear. I felt it was a very thoughtful exploration of the choices this woman makes when she holds very little personal autonomy. Catherine Deneuve is perfect, as usual.

406. Destiny, 1921. Germany.
D. Fritz Lang
So much wild cinematic evolution from 1919’s Harakiri. The close-ups are comfortable and clean, and the photographic contrast is stunning, really demonstrating Fritz Lang finding his style. I only take off a star because I was so interested in the primary story, and felt annoyed when it jumped into those mini-movie vignettes that were all the rage at this time. But overall it is spooky and lovely, and the trick photography never feels overdone. I really enjoyed it.

406. Destiny, 1921. Germany.

D. Fritz Lang

So much wild cinematic evolution from 1919’s Harakiri. The close-ups are comfortable and clean, and the photographic contrast is stunning, really demonstrating Fritz Lang finding his style. I only take off a star because I was so interested in the primary story, and felt annoyed when it jumped into those mini-movie vignettes that were all the rage at this time. But overall it is spooky and lovely, and the trick photography never feels overdone. I really enjoyed it.

405. Melancholia, 2011. Denmark.
D. Lars von Trier
A polarizing film, it seems. I liked it. Like a daydream, mesmerizing in a detached sort of way. And Dunst’s portrayal of clinical depression is dead on for this atmosphere.

405. Melancholia, 2011. Denmark.

D. Lars von Trier

A polarizing film, it seems. I liked it. Like a daydream, mesmerizing in a detached sort of way. And Dunst’s portrayal of clinical depression is dead on for this atmosphere.